The value of fame in society...



Scholarly Articles & Resources

Altman, H. (2005, March 18). Celebrity culture. CQ Researcher, 15, 245-268. Retrieved from http://library.cqpress.com/cqresearcher/ 

Batchelor, Bob. (2012). Celebrity Obsession in the 2000s. In Pop Culture Universe: Icons, Idols, Ideas. Retrieved April 11, 2012, from http://popculture2.abc-clio.com/ 

Edwards, Leigh. (2012). Do Celebrities Have Responsibilities as Role Models?. In Pop Culture Universe: Icons, Idols, Ideas. Retrieved April 23, 2012, from http://popculture2.abc-clio.com/

Fraser, B. P., & Brown, W. J. (2002). Media, Celebrities, and Social Influence: Identification With Elvis Presley. Mass Communication & Society5(2), 183-206.

Greenblatt, A. (2010, January 22). Sex scandals. CQ Researcher20, 49-72. Retrieved fromhttp://library.cqpress.com/cqresearcher/

Leslie, Larry Z. (2012). Today’s Celebrities Fail to Lead Admirable Lives. In Pop Culture Universe: Icons, Idols, Ideas. Retrieved April 11, 2012, from http://popculture2.abc-clio.com/

Lindenberg, S., Joly, J. F., & Stapel, D. A. (2011). The Norm-Activating Power of Celebrity: The Dynamics of Success and Influence. Social Psychology Quarterly, 74(1), 98-120. doi:10.1177/0190272511398208

Shaw, R. L., Whitehead, C., & Giles, D. C. (2010). ‘Crack down on the celebrity junkies’: Does media coverage of celebrity drug use pose a risk to young people?. Health, Risk & Society, 12(6), 575-589. doi:10.1080/13698575.2010.515736


Film, “Starsuckers” — http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/starsuckers/

Public Blames Media for Too Much Celebrity Coverage

Statistics

Drug Rehab

 






What is the value of celebrity coverage in the media?

Who could go without?

The media has conditioned today’s youth to be deeply interested in and curious about other people’s personal lives. They have taught us to be too open about everything we do. Our business is no longer private. The sharing of personal information is now thought to be the ‘norm’ and anyone who holds out is thought to be ‘weird’ and ‘too isolated for their own good’. 

“We’re a media- and entertainment-saturated culture that treats celebrities akin to religious icons. The media give celebrities a powerful pulpit and encourage the public’s fascination and preoccupation with celebrities,” (Houran, 2005).






Thanks to a post on social networking den Reddit the man smiling at you with his perfect hair and smile in this photo is now being called “Ridiculously Photogenic Guy”.  The photo has been viewed millions of times and Zeddie Little is now an internet celebrity thanks to one race he ran in South Carolina.
Everyone can have their fifteen minutes of fame. 

Thanks to a post on social networking den Reddit the man smiling at you with his perfect hair and smile in this photo is now being called “Ridiculously Photogenic Guy”.  The photo has been viewed millions of times and Zeddie Little is now an internet celebrity thanks to one race he ran in South Carolina.

Everyone can have their fifteen minutes of fame. 






A current of materialism runs rampant throughout our society, often because of celebrities. How many times do we turn on the television or go to the store and encounter advertising featuring celebrities? We find it difficult to ignore the things that are constantly promoted by the rich and famous.

A current of materialism runs rampant throughout our society, often because of celebrities. How many times do we turn on the television or go to the store and encounter advertising featuring celebrities? We find it difficult to ignore the things that are constantly promoted by the rich and famous.

(Source: p4ra-n0id)






(Source: sadcoreblvd)






Q&A with Orville Gilbert Brim, author of Look at Me!: The Fame Motive from Childhood to Death






The paparazzi following Miley Cyrus.

The paparazzi following Miley Cyrus.

(Source: )






Does the media devote too much attention to celebrities?






Starsuckers 

Starsuckers is a feature documentary about the celebrity obsessed media, that uncovers the real reasons behind our addiction to fame and blows the lid on the corporations and individuals who profit from it.

Made completely independently over 2 years in secret, the film journeys through the dark underbelly of the modern media. Using a combination of never before seen footage, undercover reporting, stunts and animation, the film reveals the toxic effect the media is having on us all and especially our children.

Chris Atkins presents Starsuckers as a series of five lessons on fame in the modern world: how children are persuaded that fame is something they want, how television and the media reinforces the importance of celebrity and the efforts to attain it, how the mind and body reinforces our need to follow the activities of well-known people and strive to join their number, how the press became addicted to celebrity coverage, and how the art of promoting fame has led to celebrities and their handlers controlling the press instead of the press having say.

Along the way, Atkins demonstrates how celebrity news with no basis in fact gets into print, why newspapers will run press releases almost verbatim, how parents will eagerly sign away the image rights to their kids, how certain mass scale charity events end up helping the performers far more than the causes they designed to support, and how publicists keep accurate but unflattering stories out of the news.






WHAT IS FAME?

Fame is why the latest Diet Doctor gets 10 times more press than the world’s most promising stem cell scientist.

Fame is why the first photos of J- Lo’s baby sold for millions and pics of your child are languishing on Ebay with a one dollar bid.

Fame is why Paula Deen could run for Congress in Georgia and probably win.

Fame is why we pay attention to Paris Hilton, cleverly branded as America’s party girl.

Fame explains President Obama’s election, Governor Terminator’s second term and it’s why the guy who graduated at the bottom of your law school class has a book deal, the very best clients, and is always on CNN.

what does fame mean to you?

(Source: fame101book.com)






HIGH SOCIETY: “Fame is a Hobby”






This is a great depiction of anger stemmed from the paparazzi and invasion of privacy. Celebrities sign over their privacy when they make a name for themselves, and it often gets too much to handle. Here you see Jude Law reacting in a negative way at the exposure.

(Source: bad-tempered)






(Source: sadcoreblvd)






Demi Lovato Without Makeup: Revealed on Twitter!

Demi Lovato Without Makeup: Revealed on Twitter!






Tebow the Jet: Celebrity Backup Meets Media; video attached 

(Source: abcnews.go.com)